Fight for Countryside Access

This from the Ramblers Association. Do click the link for more information and to download the FREE access guide.

Seventeen years ago today, the Countryside and Rights of Way Act was passed, giving rights of open access to more than a million hectares of countryside.

Open access land gives you the chance to step off the path and walk freely,explore wild, open landscapes and find your own way. But do you know how to identify areas of open access? Do you know where you can and can’t walk once you’ve found it? Do you know what rights and responsibilities you have once you step off the path?

We know that some people don’t feel confident in where they can and can’t walk, and in knowing their rights and responsibilities while out walking. To help, we’ve produced a free guide to open access, giving you everything you need to be able to head out and confidently explore the countryside.

Read our access guide here ►
We hope that you find the guide useful and that it helps you to get out there and explore open access land. Not sure where to start? We’ve put together a list of our favourite places to roam free.

If your favourite place doesn’t feature on our list, please get in touch to let us know!

Kind Regards,

Oliver and Laura,
The Ramblers campaigns team

Ps. Our petition to improve access to woodland has now passed 8,000 signatures. We still want to reach even more people, so do share it with your friends and family and encourage them to get involved: www.ramblers.org.uk/Forest.

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Fight for Countryside Access

    • In fact Dartmoor’s 1980s Commons Act was the role model for the CRoW legislation. There was always a de facto presumption of access on Dartmoor and it’s only in recent years this has been tampered with in a few cases as at Vixen Tor, John

      Liked by 1 person

      • Indeed Vixen Tor is out of bounds now. Although I’ve plenty of blogs were there is the belief that presumption of access still exists on tors that some say are OOB now. Bel Tor and lots around the River Tavy such as Kents Tor and Brimhill Tor

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s